Maersk latest accident analysis. What’s bad for majors, is good for shipping.

I’ve been alerted on major containers loss in the Pacific in the morning Feb 17 by one of my Russian correspondents, who at the time of this accident, was in Kuril islands waters. I’ve received time and position, so it didn’t take long to figure out the ship which lost containers in question. I informed my subscribers, providing them with all available details, posted a “blind” news without ship’s name and other details, for general public, and began waiting for the news with ship’s ID to appear in somewhere officially. Usually it takes 2-3 days, sometimes more. This time, it took some 10 hours. After ship’s ID became public, I immediately published full story, illustrated by ship track’s screenshot with dates, time, etc.

The first news to appear – all citing MSC (which in its’ turn, referred to Maersk), were roughly the same:
Maersk has informed us that the container ship MAERSK EINDHOVEN faced an engine stop in heavy weather on 17 February while en route from Xiamen, China, to Los Angeles, USA.
The preliminary advice from the vessel operator suggests that several hundred containers have been lost overboard. We also have been informed that the crew is reported safe, and the propulsion has been fixed. Maersk is currently assessing the nearest suitable port options in Asia to berth the vessel.
Later news said, that:
At the time of the incident the vessel was eastbound in the Pacific having passed Japan. Propulsion was restored and according to Maersk the ship has reversed course and is expected to divert to the nearest port in Asia capable of dealing with the situation.
By that time media could already see my track screenshot, or even find out track themselves, to understand, that the “turning back after restoring propulsion” narrative doesn’t fit in. If that was the case, disabled ship drifted for some 32 hours on a straight line with some 15-16 knots speed. Even industry media should understand that this is utterly impossible, but they didn’t, they missed the whole big picture right in front of their eyes, and kept sticking to narrative. Maersk was the one who figured it out, and published a revised press-release – not because Maersk was all that eager to correct media and inform public, but because improbability of this version wasn’t to be missed by interested parties.

Second version is no less curious:
“As previously reported, the Maersk Eindhoven experienced a loss of engine propulsion for 3-4 minutes while sailing 45 nautical miles off Northern Japan in heavy seas on 17 February. The loss of maneuverability resulted in severe rolling with 260 containers overboard and 65 containers damaged on deck. Propulsion power was quickly restored on the vessel and the initial analysis indicates engine oil pressure triggered a safety feature, causing the engines to shut down. The crew is safe and a complete investigation is ongoing. The vessel has had no further incidents and is sailing in calm seas, returning to a North Asia port for inspection and repair”.
The ship is sailing in calm seas, said Maersk. The ship is sailing back in exactly the same waters she was sailing two days ago, but the seas, miraculously, became calm.
The ship lost propulsion for 3-4 minutes – stated loss couldn’t take more time because if longer, it should show up on track and in records, and there are no traces of such an accident – no track curves, no “not under command” records, no sharp speed decline. OK, let’s assume that there was a 3-4 minutes long propulsion loss. But for a giant ship like this one, it means, that she couldn’t lose her maneuverability and run out, to become a toy for rough seas to toss her around. She should remain under control until propulsion was restored, that is to say – she couldn’t be turned broadside to waves and suffer “severe rolling”. Blackout and rudder jam could lead to such an event, but no blackout or rudder jam were mentioned (maybe later, in new “revised” press-releases?).
The ship wasn’t sailing through some catastrophic typhoon, weather and seas were normal for winter season in North Pacific. Nothing extraordinary. How come, then, that a short, 3-4 minutes long, engine failure, ended in a major containers loss? It doesn’t add up. Loss of propulsion due to engine or mechanical failure is a wide-spread accident worldwide, especially in recent times with new, insane “environmental” regulations, which left ships vulnerable to numerous engine breakdowns. Still, these accidents in overwhelming majority, don’t evolve into major ones, and they can’t, if the ship is seaworthy, and crew is competent.

I believe the reason why MAERSK EINDHOVEN accident was signed off as a result of engine failure, is pretty obvious. One more major containers loss and damage is one more proof of, by now, an obvious fact, that there’s something inherently wrong with the whole scheme of giant container ships. Plus a very fishy global containers crisis, coming seemingly, out of nowhere, without any sound physical, fundamental grounds. Too many inconvenient questions may be asked – well, should be asked, and more – all of it, all the process of monopolizing liner container market during at least last decade, should be scrutinized and investigated. Not that it will happen of course, at least any time soon. But Maersk is trying to save the face and probably, is preparing for legal battles ensuing from this latest major loss. Hence the 3-4 minutes explanation. One of media outlets in early news speculated on the identity of owners of containers loaded on upper deck – there’s a high probability, that they belong to main USA importers of China-made goods, like Nike or Amazon or Apple. If that’s the case, it means, in plain language, that we’re witnessing rats in leftist/Great-Reset cage, already fighting each other. Time to enjoy the show. Let them eat themselves, we – commons, can’t care less, we can only welcome it.

I don’t like major shipping corporations, to put it very gently. But saying that, I can’t but highlight Maersk as my favorite. No other major is so proactive, so antsy and so ever-ready to come up with new ideas and projects, all of which are lined up with WEF/UN Great Reset deadly agenda. Everything ruinous for effective, low-cost and market-based shipping (but very good for monopolies), is either proposed by Maersk, or warmly welcomed, be it “green sustainable” idiocy or total digitalization and control, or whatnot. Majors are collaborating with enemy attacking mankind, because they believe it’s good for them (and it is good for them, but alas, not for long, though they don’t understand it). Maersk is leading the mob, being most conspicuous among them, most obsessed in its’ strive for power.
Intellectual level of majors’ CEOs, those who come vocal with new projects or trendy virtue signaling, is horrendous, it’s below anything slightly competent and responsible. They can’t be trusted with sweeping the floors, for God’s sake.
Not much else to say – I can only repeat what I already said: this new, unprecedented attack on humanity, called UN Agenda 2021 or WEF Great Reset, is bound to fail, it’s absolutely dystopian, unrealistic and incompatible with human nature and God, anti-human plan. But it’s very attractive, during its’ early stages, for many idiots, from leftist to monopolies. When they’ll realize that the plan is murderous for them also, that they are not any exception, it will be too late. It’s already happening, signs can be seen everywhere. Relative to shipping, present situation can be summarized in just one phrase – “what’s bad for majors, is good for shipping”.

MAERSK EINDHOVEN latest Update:
Feb 22 UPDATE: The ship is making loops back and forth south of Tokyo Bay (east of Oshima island), probably waiting for a berth. She arrived at cruising area in the evening Feb 21 (LT), started moving towards Yokohama early Feb 22, but turned back and as of 0500 UTC Feb 22, is again, cruising in legs in the same area.

Links: Maersk Advisory: https://www.maersk.com/news/articles/2021/02/18/maersk-eindhoven-103n-encounters-harsh-weather-transpacific-6-service
Maritime Bulletin news/updates: http://www.maritimebulletin.net/2021/02/17/many-containers-lost-by-neopanamax-container-ship-in-north-pacific/
MSC Advisory: https://www.msc.com/ncl/notices/2021-february/maersk-eindhoven-incident-on-msc-s-pearl-service

Waypoints, track details:


Time


Event



Description


Speed


Course



Coordinates


2021-02-19
00:43 +07

Destination
changed

New destination: JP
YOK XX SHN


2021-02-18
10:50 +07

At high speed

16.7 kn

W

45° 16′ 55″ N ; 155°
27′ 27″ E  satellite


2021-02-18
10:26 +07

Back to
normal speed

15.7 kn

W

45° 18′ 50″ N ; 155°
36′ 22″ E  satellite


2021-02-18
08:58 +07

Location
Report

Position:
Oyashio Current, RU

17.0 kn

W

45° 25′ 49″ N ; 156°
09′ 04″ E  satellite



2021-02-18
07:26 +07


At
high speed


Turned
back



17.8 kn


SE


45° 32′
48″ N ; 156° 42′ 08″ E  satellite


2021-02-18
01:25 +07

Location
Report

Position:
Oyashio Current, RU

13.0 kn

E

45° 11′ 20″ N ; 154°
56′ 42″ E  satellite


2021-02-17
19:56 +07

Location
Report

Position:
Oyashio Current, RU

13.7 kn

E

44° 47′ 14″ N ; 153°
19′ 40″ E  satellite


2021-02-17
13:44 +07

Location
Report

Position:
Oyashio Current, RU

13.9 kn

E

44° 19′ 54″ N ; 151°
27′ 23″ E  satellite


2021-02-17
07:00 +07


Location
Report


Position:
Oyashio Current,


14.4 kn


NE


43° 48′ 26″ N ; 149°
23′ 58″ E  satellite



2021-02-17
01:26 +07



Location Report



Containers lost between these 2 positions


 


14.5 kn


NE


43° 17′
05″ N ; 147° 45′ 26″ E  satellite



2021-02-16

19:12 +07


Location
Report


13.1 kn


NE


42° 42′
07″ N ; 145° 59′ 38″ E  satellite


2021-02-16
15:10 +07

Location
Report

Position:
Oyashio Current, JP

14.6 kn

NE

42° 18′ 13″ N ; 144°
49′ 34″ E  terrestrial

Author

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My name is Mikhail Voytenko, I’m Russian, professional merchant marine navigator, by education and former experience. I own and run Maritime Bulletin website for more than 10 years. I've been involved in solving a number of piracy hijack cases, including the hijack of ro-ro FAINA, loaded with tanks. It was me who made public, and unravel, freighter ARCTIC SEA mystery. I've been also closely involved in a number of maritime disaster, one of them being MSC FLAMINIA major fire.